Lossless audio compression for project work and archive – what do you use and why?

I’ve been using lossless audio compression as a matter of course in my audio workflow for a while, and not just for end-distribution.  Services like Bandcamp and Soundcloud support uploading in FLAC format, and many clients happily accept ALAC (Apple Lossless) or FLAC in place of traditional uncompressed WAV or AIFF formats.

As for long-term storage and archiving, I’ve switched to FLAC for my projects, and have back-converted most of my catalogue.  But why FLAC?


  • The reduction in network bandwidth and storage requirements is always nice.
  • It brings the possibility of checking the project audio files for errors via the FLAC checkum (applied at the time of creation) against how the file decompresses in present-day.
    • This can show up problems with “bit-rot” on disk storage that would otherwise remain hidden.  It’s a useful alternative to deploying ZFS-based file systems and keeps storage and network kit at an affordable “prosumer” level while such technologies mature a little longer, and hopefully come down in cost too.
    • If I find a problem file? Fine – restore from a good backup.  But that does rely of course on having good backups, and the corruption not being carried into those!
  • It’s an established format that many, many software applications can read, across a wide variety of operating systems – and given the number of websites springing up offering “audiophile” digital transfers of consumer audio material based upon the format, I have good confidence that software to read and write to the format will continue to be developed for some years ahead.  And if not, it’s still easy enough to batch-convert files to whatever format replaces it.

Cons (none unique to FLAC, I notice):

  • Reaper is my DAW of choice, and exporting large projects out to FLAC is time-consuming as it still doesn’t multithread FLAC exports for projects.
  • While Reaper *does* support (in version 5.111, at last check) recording directly to FLAC and other formats, recording to anything other than WAV or AIFF on my systems has consistently thrown up audible glitches in the recorded material. With some sample-accurate editing these can be fixed, but still not acceptable.
    • What I do therefore is to record to WAV/AIFF first, then save the project to FLAC before any significant mix down happens.
  • Not every DAW supports FLAC natively, or at all.  But then, for me this is a moot point – not every DAW can read project files from every other DAW, so this is just a part of that wider picture.  You pick your tool for the job and deal with the consequences.
  • Conversion takes time, especially offline for large projects.

So  – that’s a quick brain-dump of how I’m working with this stuff and why. I’ve missed steps and I’m sure others will be quick to pick holes in it.

I suppose my question to anyone else reading this with sufficient interest is… What is everyone else doing? What file format would you pick, and why?


New music: Innocence 2010

I spent much of this weekend re-writing an old tune of mine from some ten years ago – perhaps more.  Yes, the song was originally written for a girl (I thought I was *so* romantic!), and that relationship never came to anything.  While I was working on this new version, I was thinking about what I would tell my ten-years-younger self, given the opportunity?  Would I actively help him make sense of everything he’s seeing, thinking and feeling?  Would I just listen?  Or would I perhaps just say the simple words “it gets better”?

Innocence 2010 by Abstractnoise (MP3)

Innocence 2010 by Abstractnoise (HQ AIFF)

In taking on the re-write, my main aim was to attempt to get to know a combination of music software on my mac,  so the whole thing was produced in Reaper (a nice MIDI/Audio sequencer), FreeAlpha (making most of the sounds heard in the track) and SampleTank 2.5 (which provides the 808-a-like snare and hats, and the mellotron which I absolutely adore!).

For those who remember it, I hope I’ve added to the story without losing too much of the slightly childish, simplistic feel  of the original.  Ten years is a lot of life and musical experience…