Mac OS X Yosemite Quarantine issues and workaround…

Getting bored of having to do stuff like this, both at work and play.

Many useful Mac apps still come in from places on the Internet OTHER THAN the Mac App Store.  This might be news to the boffins at Apple, but there you go.  This can cause problems at a user-level, where we end up with warning messages like these every time we try and start an installed application:

“xxxxxxxxxx” is an application downloaded from the Internet. Are you sure you want to open it?

AAAAAAAARGHH!  OF COURSE I want to open it! I installed it! I even used my Admin rights to move it to my Applications folder, and it’s been there for months, perhaps years! So quit telling me about this every time I open it!

Okay, chill, breathe, take your meds, it’s time to fix this.  Again, Google to the rescue, and I found a lot of people have been having this kind of issue since Lion.  I have to admit I’ve managed to not have it bite me or my pool of users in the bum at all, (except on first-use of the application, which is fine, because that’s all it needs) until Yosemite.  And specifically, Yosemite’s 10.10.2 point-release.  Ugh.

In all cases, people have reported general success by many sledgehammer-to-crack-walnut means, mostly by turning security and quarantine features off.  I prefer not to do that, so I much enjoyed the more fine-grained solution found here.  Not sure how it’ll work as apps get upgraded, but even if it needs redoing at this point, it’s better than being prompted every time I open an app I regularly use!

So, rather than rewording, I’ll quote D. W. Hoard’s words from his article (linked above):

The quarantine flag can be removed from files or applications that are already downloaded, without completely disabling the quarantine mechanism, by using the following command:

xattr -d com.apple.quarantine /PATH/TO/APPLICATION

A slight shortcut is to type everything up to the path (including the trailing space) in a Terminal window, then drag the desired application or file from a Finder window into the Terminal window, which will automatically paste in the full path to the application or file. If you perform this process using an Administrator account, then the quarantine will be permanently removed for all users on the same computer, regardless of the Administrator privilege level of their accounts.

Oh gosh, I had a horrible thought… it reminds me of the dark days of MS Vista… 😮

(Nearly) Two weeks with a Samsung Chromebook 303C

Scope of review

In the week before Christmas, we took delivery of a Samsung Chromebook Series 3 (303C) – with the intention of reviewing it for suitability towards a distinct usergroup we administer.  So to that end I’ve spent many hours using this machine in place of my usual MacBook Pro (for work) and occasionally for personal use in place of my usual Windows 8-based netbook.  I’ve taken some notes as I’ve encountered thoughts and issues provoked in daily use, which have been compiled into this review (which itself was written on the Chromebook in Google Docs) for others to see where I’ve got to with it and why.  Hopefully it will inform and comment rather than poke holes or fun.
Please note therefore that this review is neither an analysis of Google software/policy/infrastructure, nor is it an in-depth user manual for this machine or the Chrome OS it runs.  Others have these functions covered far better elsewhere.

Setting the scene

The computing market has been flooded with sub-£400 laptops in recent years, with many being in the small “netbook” form-factor.  Their primary intended use is for the consumption of online content, and getting simple tasks done like email, letter-writing, online banking etc.  Most of these netbooks run full copies of Windows or Linux and offering power enough to run basic internet, office and even multimedia software – this has given us a new class of affordable machines with surprising processing power and flexibility, despite being designed for much simpler tasks.  New models continue to be offered with Windows 8 and Intel/AMD x86-compatible processors.

Cheap, powerful computing – what it *can* be

I bought an Asus EeePC 1011PX to aid study and note-taking in 2011.  As I progressed through the studies beyond simple note-taking, writing up projects in Microsoft Office 2010, it has been used for mixing multitrack audio on the move, as well as room-acoustics analysis with a USB test mic.  That’s an amazing amount of processing power and flexibility for £230, even though that doesn’t include the extra hardware and software I now use with it.
To get the best out of such a small machine, I’ve had to carefully analyse my needs and find solutions that scale down appropriately to such a small machine.  Document compatibility issues finally pushed me to purchase and relearn Microsoft Office 2010.  To make that transition I ditched the dog-slow Windows 7 Starter Edition in favour of the two major consumer-previews of Windows 8, enjoying both enough to finally upgrade to the release version Windows 8 Pro.
I’ve also had to deal with what I feel was more than my fair share of maintenance.  Within 11 months of purchase both the fan and hard-drive failed, both of which were dealt with surprisingly quickly by the manufacturers’ UK repair agents.  No surprise that these moving parts needed replacement, but within 11 months?  The OS itself needs to update itself from time to time, as do most of the individual applications – albeit less often and usually without requiring a reboot.
So all this leads me to ask; what makes the Chromebook any better than what I know of an arguably similarly-specified Windows machine at a similar price point, and what can one expect from such a machine?

Software and hardware

First-off, a Chromebook comes preinstalled with enough of an operating system (OS) to run Google Chrome, and connect to the outside world via WiFi and Bluetooth wireless, alongside slots for USB and SD-cards.  Anything that can be done inside a web-browser can be done with a Chromebook.  This essentially makes it a Netbook in the most literal definition of the word.
Additional software is available, but only in the form of web-apps that can be installed inside Google Chrome itself.  This should ensure an increased level of OS security and stability compared with a full-blown Windows, Mac or Linux installation, since the user cannot fiddle with it.  It should also ensure that software updates are much more limited in scope and number, since there are less components on the Chromebook.
Installing Microsoft Office is out of the question, but that doesn’t mean that the machine can’t be useful for paper-based productivity – but instead of Office, Google would expect you to use their Docs/Drive package with a Google account.  Instead of Outlook, Gmail – this would include calendar and contacts functionality.

User data

A Chromebook typically comes with very little built-in storage.  The Samsung 303C tested here comes with a 16GB SSD which is seemingly used for both the built-in OS and any user-data such as downloads, etc.  With such limited onboard storage, multimedia options are limited to anything that can be downloaded from the Internet, or played directly from USB/SD media.
The idea of the Chromebook platform is that it acts as an interface to cloud-based storage and management of email and documents – and is clearly best used with a Google account.  If you don’t have one, the machine will allow you to create an account as part of the login process.

First impressions – hardware

 

  • Fast boot time (needs measuring)
  • Easy to get going with Google account credentials or as a guest user
  • Fast to sleep and to wake up.

Display

Pros

 

  • Surprisingly nice screen – compares well with existing Asus EeePC 1011PX netbook. Pixel size seems ideal for form-factor.
  • Text rendering looks surprisingly crisp – without being fatiguing.
  • Matte finish much nicer to use than the reflective shiny glass finish on Macs and some PC laptops.

Cons

 

  • HDMI connection to second monitor has yet to work with any DVI or HDMI-equipped TV or computer monitor I’ve tried – usually causing the laptop screen to go dark.  This might make presentations a problem.

Build

Pros

 

  • Thin
  • Light
  • Feels solid in the hand.

Cons

 

  • Fiddly to open one-handed, but too light and small to easily open two-handed.  Could easily have been solved by setting a bigger indent just under the trackpad to offer more grip.
  • Silver coating is really too easy to scratch. The underside of the machine is scratched up after a day’s use, and it’s only ever been on a clean desk, or inside a padded case.
  • The “G” from the Samsung lid decals has fallen off – not good since the unit has only ever travelled in my hand or a soft case!
  • While the machine feels solid enough in handling, the screen does seem to touch the keyboard when folded down, allowing dust and skin-grease to transfer, particularly from the spacebar to form lines on the screen.  This is a common problem to all plastic-screened laptops and notebooks I’ve used.  Models such as recent MacBook Pro’s with much more solid glass-faced screens seem to flex less easily to begin with, and mark less easily than the plastic if they do make contact with the keys.
  • Headphone socket is a very tight fit with most standard 3.5mm plugs encountered during the trial.  Really does feel like I’m going to break the machine if I push too hard.  This is the complete opposite case to most laptops I’ve ever encountered, whose headphone/line-out connections are generally too loose, causing nightmares for corporate presentations.

Keyboard

Pros

 

  • Full-size keyboard is very much like the MacBook (Pro) machines we’ve been using for the last five or more years.
  • Function keys well thought out with dedicated (and marked) keys for tab refresh, maximise, window cycle, brightness, volume mute/down/up, standby.
  • Typing longer documents (like this review, even) is a surprisingly comfortable experience – I’m finding it hard to feel any notable difference between this and a MacBook.
  • Dedicated “Search” button likely more useful to modern users than “Caps Lock”, but…

Cons

 

  • …Where’s the CAPSLOCK KEY SO I CAN SHOUT AT PEOPLE??!
    • Actually, Alt-Search has the same effect – makes sense since the search key is in the traditional place for the Caps Lock key, but this config could confuse new users who might not understand why their Chromebook “randomly” brings up a search function!
  • No “Delete” key, nor obvious way to replicate function.
  • Left and right arrow function keys would make most sense as a way of moving across tabs in the same window, but don’t appear to do anything?
  • No media keys – would be useful for YouTube, Google Play Music player, etc

Trackpad

 

  • Like many new machines, this was set a little slow by default. Soon fixed by adjusting settings (more on this later).
  • Right-clicking with two-finger tapping seems hit-and-miss.  Right side seems more sensitive/accurate to touch gestures than left.
  • Works best either with a firm thumb-push at the bottom (where buttons used to be before smooth trackpads became the “in thing”), or using tap-to-click. To this end-user, this feature seems no different to the glass Apple Trackpads fitted to aluminium unibody models.

Built-in software – in use

User accounts

 

  • Multiple user accounts can be set up on the same Chromebook.
  • “Admin” tools, suitable for remote control and corporate deployment are available as part of a Google Apps domain (how else?), but at a cost of something around $20 per year per machine at a quick glance.
  • Most users will likely be fine with a strong password and normal “user accounts”.
  • “guest” (browser-only”) access can be selected as an option at login/lock screens.
  • Accounts can be “locked” after sleep, requiring password (or switch to guest/alternate account) to wake – important for security.

Taskbar; a.k.a Launcher

 

  • Seems to be fixed at the bottom of the screen – but can be set to auto-hide.
  • Left side shows currently-open apps
  • Apps can be pinned to the launcher, much like Windows.
    • Some apps open in their own window, some open in a new tab.
    • Right side shows clock, WiFi, battery and account avatar pic by default.  Also shows notification of audio muting and caps-lock.

Menus

 

  • Relatively few built into the OS itself.
  • Tend to be limited to particular app (for the browser) or function (for things like WiFi, Bluetooth etc.)

Network connectivity

This machine’s sole means of connectivity with the outside world is via WiFi, which supports WPA, WEP and unencrypted connections on 2.4GHz (a/b/g) or 5GHz (n) WiFi networks.  Connectivity has been consistently good with a variety of Ruckus, Netgear and Apple access points.

Bluetooth connectivity

File transfer

Not attempted as couldn’t get the Bluetooth Stack to connect with any phone compatible with bluetooth file transfer protocols.

Keyboard/Mouse

Pairing an Apple keyboard/mouse set with the Chromebook was easy, once I’d remembered (searched Google for) the method to get the devices into a discoverable state.  Keymapping seemed reasonably logical – with volume, screen brightness, dashboard and windowing keys apparently behaving as expected.
Interesting discovery:  Playing a WAV file from a CF card (via USB card reader) brings up a built-in Music app – which does seem to respond even to the media keys on the Apple keyboard – impressive since there are no marked media keys on the built-in keyboard.  Nice little “easter egg” inserted to make developers’ lives easier perhaps?

Internet tethering

See “Interacting with Smartphones” below.

Windowing

Apps can be set (usually by right-clicking on them in the Launcher bar or menu) to the following windowing modes:

  1. As standard tab
  2. As pinnned tab
  3. Maximised
  4. Fullscreen

In real use, the actual implementation (and terminology) seem confusing and inconsistent.  “Maximised” Gmail has a different (and more minimalist) window style to any other “maximised” tab.  Some other apps (Scratchpad, for example) seem to be able to use the same minimalist maximised style, but not everything.

File management

It’s bound to happen – at some point in using a Chromebook, you’ll find that you’ve got some file(s) from a camera or USB drive that need attaching to an email or uploading to cloud storage somewhere.
Essentially, anything presenting itself as a USB Mass Storage Device, when plugged into one of the USB ports on the back of the machine, will bring up the File Manager window and make the contents available.  Obviously not every file type can be opened directly on the machine, but all files can at least be copied, uploaded or attached to emails.
Pretty much all common disk formats are supported, with no problems found during testing when reading and writing to USB drives formatted to default Mac OS X or Windows 8 settings.  According to the relevant Google support page, common Linux filesystems are compatible too – so the average user should rarely get into a situation where a given USB drive is unreadable.

A note about photos

Inserting an SD card or USB drive full of pics straight from a camera gives access to the pictures via the file manager.

  • Photos can be viewed as a slideshow directly from the drive.
  • Opening a photo will view the photo fullscreen.
  • Once the photo is open, the file manager also includes some simple editing tools:
    • Editing mode is enabled by clicking on the pencil icon that appears in the bottom-right corner of the preview screen/window.
    • WARNING:  ANY EDITS ARE AUTOMATICALLY OVERWRITTEN BY DEFAULT!

Web browsing

This machine essentially is Google Chrome, with enough of an OS to run it.  So browsing the web is essentially the same as it would be on any other machine supporting the same version of Chrome.

Apps

The Apps menu links to various built-in apps by default, including an app for the webstore where additional software from Google and third-parties can be installed. Note that this doesn’t mean you can install standard Mac, Windows or Linux software on this machine at all, let alone expect it to run.
Any apps installed are essentially plugins that extend the functionality of the Chrome web browser.  If you sync your Chrome settings to your Google account, then all pre-existing bookmarks, settings and apps installed on other machines should find themselves synced on the Chromebook.

Settings

All machine settings are essentially available through the Settings tab of the Chrome browser itself – with some shortcuts (date/time, WiFi, Battery) on launcher.

Email

Online

Uses the normal web Gmail interface, just like any other browser.

Offline

Available via a free downloadable Offline Google Mail app, from the Chrome web store.

  • Interface looks more like Mail.app on iPad than the usual Gmail web interface.
  • Offline syncing selectable up to whole of previous months’-worth of messages.
  • Some odd windowing issues when composing or filing messages.
  • Also default zoom levels needed reducing (eg press ctrl & – to zoom out) to make text in “Apply” and “Cancel” boxes

Smartphone interoperability

Given the cloud-based credentials of the Chromebook and Chrome OS, how does one get at photos, audio or video recorded on a smartphone?  it would seem that these should be synced to a suitable cloud-based service via some form of native app running directly on the device itself.  Once in the cloud, they’re accessed through a browser or web-app like any other web content.

Interaction with iPhone 3G (iOS 3.1.3)

 

  • No way to get photos or other content direct from device over USB.
  • No mobile Internet tethering via USB/Bluetooth. No WiFi tethering via iPhone 3G without jailbreaking the iPhone, which is untested as I don’t want to jailbreak my work phone!
  • All Google services accessible through Safari will be synced with same services accessed via Chromebook.

Interaction with iPhone 4 (iOS 6.0.1)

As iPhone 3G above, but:

  • Wifi hotspot may be possible but unable to test as the feature is locked out on my iPhone/plan.
  • All Google iOS apps, AND services available through Safari/any other browser app, will stay in sync with content accessed via the Chromebook.

 

 

Burning Data DVD/CD from Mac OS X “Lion” (10.7.x), for use on non-apple devices

Slight alarm bells ringing here.  It’s been a while since I last had to burn optical media for anything other than DVD-video mastering, so it’s not an issue I’m likely to have come across since the early days of Mac OS X “Leopard” (10.5.x).

This afternoon I happily burned a DVD using Apple Finder as usual, and it all went fine, verifying as usual. Since the target is a mixture of users on Windows and Mac OS X, I asked a Windows-using colleague to check the burned DVD worked on her machine.  Epic Fail.  Came up with the usual dialogue box asking how to open the contents, and Explorer showed the disc as having nothing in the root directory.

When I took the disc back and mounted it on the Mac, I checked in Disk Utility and sure enough, the mounted drive is in the native HFS+ format for Macs. Totally useless on PC’s.  I’m sure Mac OS X used to burn Hybrid media suitable for use on either Mac or PC, but this seems to have changed somewhere in the last few years.

Googling the problem online doesn’t bring up obvious answers, so I had to do a little more digging.  One possible solution was found here in the Apple discussion forums, which I’m now trying for myself.

Burn (Freeware utility) for Mac OS, on Sourceforge

Image

So – I’ve told it to create a disk image suitable for PC’s (as shown in the dropdown menu above), and I’ll mount it in the Finder before burning to DVD to see what format the image actually has:

Image

Good sign – the Finder sees ISO 9660 (Joliet).  Now I just need to burn the image to disk, which I’m doing from inside the Burn app rather than asking Disk Utility to burn an ISO.  I’ll test that later.

So while I wait for the disk to burn. I’ll add to these notes that I need to check the disc on a Windows box, to check that the file names remain intact.  For some uses this might not matter, but for the application I have in mind (sending multitrack audio projects to multiple users for training purposes), the file and directory names to remain intact for Reaper (or any other audio sequencer) to find them again without having have the user point it to them.

As I write this I also realise that the burning process, despite being set to run at 8x (the fastest the drive supports) and the data-set and transfer rate remain the same as in Disk Utility, seems to be taking about twice as long as Disk Utility.

The final result:

Image

Also looking promising – let’s test it on a Windows box and see what it looks like!

UPDATE:  Fail. Comes up as blank DVD in Windows.  

Looks like the only option left in the time available is to transfer the content via USB key and burn the disk on Windows.

Anyone else have any better solutions that don’t involve spending money or reverting to the command-line?

Questions about O2 Wireless Box III / BeBox equivalent

Anyone know why WiFi on these boxes stops transmitting Bonjour data, thus breaking Time Machine, Remote Desktop Sharing, AFP file sharing among others? It seems to correlate with signal quality and/or interference from neighbouring networks. It seems that once every week or so the quality goes down enough that network traffic grinds to a halt over WiFi. Changing the WiFi channel frequency to one that is less congested seems to help for another week.

The issue affects our G4 iMac (OS X 10.4), 2007 MacBook Black (OS X 10.6) and 2009 MacBook Pro 13″ (OS X 10.6) uniformly. Don’t have any Windows or Linux boxen to compare service. Our iPhones don’t use Bonjour for anything I can think of, so I don’t know whether the issue would affect them too.

Connecting to the same router/network using a cable seems to always work, so it is something specific to the WiFi section of the modem.

I’m confused and would like the nonsense to stop… Can anyone help?

Why I switched to Mac…

I had forgotten just how bad Windows XP used to be, until a colleague started struggling yesterday with a modem that had mysteriously stopped working.  The transcript below covers about 2 hours of “online chat” with Zoom, who in fairness I think ought to be given a medal for trying so hard as they did.  As of right now, the modem is sitting in a drawer waiting to be put to emergency deployment on someone’s Mac when an ADSL or WiFi connection goes down.

Eddie L.: Hi, my name is Eddie L.. How may I help you?
Chris Ferguson: Hi there.  Windows XP (bless it) has decided it can’t find our modem.  We’ve tried restarting the machine without the modem, then restarted it again, then plugged the modem back in and Windows now sees the device.  But, two things now happen:
Chris Ferguson: 1)  The phone/modem devices control panel tells me the modem is on COM4.  We try to dial with it, only to be told that Windows cannot communicate with the modem on COM4.  This port does not appear in Device Manager/Hardware.
Chris Ferguson: 2)  Windows occasionally prompts that the USB device we’ve plugged in is not recognised.  It helpfully says to click on the notice for help, where it then merrily tells me which devices are unrecognised (by listing them as unrecognised, duh) but then makes no further attempt to “help”.
Chris Ferguson: the modem itself is fine, as is the phone line we connected it to.  I know this because I tried the modem on my Mac and dialled out to an ISP with no issues.
Chris Ferguson: Thoughts?
Eddie L.: click on Start > Control Panel > System > Hardware tab > Device Manager. click on the + next to modems and do you see USB Modem? If so does it have a yellow question mark or exclamation point?
Chris Ferguson: Nothing found there, last I looked.  Will check again now…
Eddie L.: ok. how about “other devices” do you see that listed?
Chris Ferguson: …trying to find it now, but System Properties has crashed, so I can’t get to the Device Manager to check.  Tried to query the modem from its diagnostics page (via Control Panel) but windows said it couldn’t connect to the modem.
Chris Ferguson: let’s see if I can get to the Device Manager any other way…
Chris Ferguson: Nope.  System Properties window has crashed and I can’t see which process to kill to get control back again.  A system restart will take a few minutes.
Chris Ferguson: Okay – managed to get control of the window again.  The modem is detected as “USB Modem”.
Chris Ferguson: That helps?
Chris Ferguson: Anything else you’d like to know?
Eddie L.: is there any exclamation point or question mark next to it?
Chris Ferguson: No
Eddie L.: double click on it and go into the Diagnostic and try querying the modem
Chris Ferguson: okay – will do that and be right back..
Chris Ferguson: Right.  “The modem failed to respond.  Make sure it is properly connected and turned on.  If it is an internal modem or is connected, verify that the interrupt for the port is properly set.”
Chris Ferguson: Next?
Eddie L.: ok. Have you tried uninstalling and reinstalling the drivers?
Chris Ferguson: No – happy to do that now though if you think that’ll fix it?
Eddie L.: yea lets try that. Since it is having problems being recognized maybe the drivers are corrupted.
Chris Ferguson: Another reason I want nothing to do with Windows…
Chris Ferguson: Okay, will go do that and report back.
Eddie L.: okay
Chris Ferguson: machine locked up hard. restarted, will try again.
Eddie L.: ok
Chris Ferguson: Right.  Uninstalled the driver.  Plugged modem in, device was recognised but software could not be found.  So I started up the Setup.exe with the drivers downloaded from your website this morning.  It found the modem, installed drivers.  Then came up with a screen saying “USB MODEM”  and “FAILED”, saying to press OK to install Netwaiting or some such.  The window closed on clicking “OK”, and the machine now refuses to see the modem anywhere in device manager.
Chris Ferguson: While I typed that message, the machine spotted the USB device and couldn’t find drivers.  And so the loop continues.
Eddie L.: So you do not see Modems or Other devices in the device manager list?
Chris Ferguson: Nope.
Eddie L.: Reboot the PC one more time
Chris Ferguson: Rebooting now.  Then what?
Eddie L.: then go into the device manager and see if the modem is listed
Chris Ferguson: Listed, with exclamation mark.  Windows came up with the Found New Hardware Wizard as soon as I was able to see the desktop.
Chris Ferguson: Next?
Eddie L.: is it now listed in the device manager?
Chris Ferguson: Yes, it’s listed with an exclamation mark.
Eddie L.: double click on it and select drivers then update driver
Eddie L.: select No not at this time and click on next. The select the automatically and click on next
Chris Ferguson: “No not at this time” is not an option.  I can either install automatically or from a specific location.
Eddie L.: automatically
Chris Ferguson: “Cannot install this hardware”.
Chris Ferguson: Should I “finish” or try installing from a specific location? (I have the downloaded drivers unpacked on the desktop, so could try pointing Windows at that, given that the included Setup.exe fails)
Chris Ferguson: Uh… you still there?  What do I do now?
Chris Ferguson: Hello?
Eddie L.: please hold for a moment
Eddie L.: ok. Lets do the update driver again and manually point it to the INF file
Chris Ferguson: Right.  I’m on it.
Eddie L.: but point it to the drivers that you have downloaded
Chris Ferguson: I can’t get the update wizard to look at the specific folder.  It threw up an error saying it couldn’t find a better driver, then when I cleared the error it went ahead and installed the driver from C:\Windows\System.  And then threw up an “Error 10 – device cannot start”.
Chris Ferguson: Now what?
Eddie L.: hold for a moment
Eddie L.: To be honest I don’t know what is going on. Were there any new updates, or installation done before the modem stopped responding
Chris Ferguson: None that we know of.
Eddie L.: okay.
Eddie L.: how long has this unit worked for?
Chris Ferguson: About two years
Eddie L.: Have you tried connecting it to another USB port on the computer?
Chris Ferguson: Yes.  Same results.  Same madness
Eddie L.: can I have the serial number of the modem please
Chris Ferguson: Didn’t that come with the chat login details?
Eddie L.: no. All we are able to see is first, last name, and email
Chris Ferguson: So what was the point of submitting the other “compulsory information”?  Anyways – serial is 2947-56540F-0423
Eddie L.: we are limited on our PCs. I think the other information are only viewable by supervisors or the admin.
Eddie L.: To be honest I don’t know what is going on.

That last line pretty much says it all.  This kind of thing was happening to me on a pretty-much monthly basis back in the days when I ran two Windows machines networked together at home.  I used to keep three PCI modems and three Ethernet cards, and I’d rotate them around the machines every time one of them mysteriously stopped working.

Ah, the memories…

 

Meanwhile Eddie L, whoever you are, if we ever meet in person I’ll buy you a beer.  You were awesome.