…and I’m rather excited.

I’ve been a fan of the Volumio Project for rather a while now, since discovering it as a good platform for my Raspberry Pi audio player a year or more ago.  Several self-built MPD-based setups have come and gone since the Raspberry Pi arrived, but Volumio has been the mainstay for reliable playback with control from numerous devices.  The main draw for me has been the combination of its web interface, the fact the hard work has been done for me in terms of getting all the software components working together, and the fact that the whole package does seem to sound good.

On reflection I’m not sure that the various “audio optimizations” at the kernel or any other level really make an audible difference, but I do know that the whole package does seem to work more reliably on the limited resources of Raspberry Pi hardware than anything I’ve been able to cook up myself, at least without significant effort expended.

So why does an x86 port excite me so much?  Two reasons:

  1. More processing power availability opens the platform up to interesting things like DSP and dual-use such as streaming to remote machines and the like without falling over.  Presently I’d have multiple Raspberry Pi’s set up with dedicated tasks.  That’s been educational, but arguably a lot of hassle to set up and maintain. A single machine would make some of this stuff easier.
  2. Opening up the platform to more common (and more powerful) hardware fvastly extends the range of audio and storage hardware that can usefully be used with it, and perhaps extends Volumio’s exposure on the wider marketplace.

The Raspberry Pi is an amazing platform for what it is – and audio systems based upon its limited bus bandwidth are capable of sounding incredible. But not everyone has a NAS to throw their music onto, which makes the Pi’s USB2 storage a pain to deal with when using it for networking, local storage AND the audio device all at the same time.  And even those two do use it with a NAS are hampered by the 100MB Ethernet connection.  Sure, streaming even “HD” audio files  won’t tax it, but storing, backing up and indexing large audio collections will.  And THIS is where even an old Netbook could best it.

At some point where time allows, I’m looking forward to putting my elderly ASUS Netbook through its paces with a 192KHz-capable USB2 audio device and either a USB drive or “Gigabit” Ethernet adaptor (its own onboard Ethernet, like the Pi’s, is limited to 100MB), to see how it stacks up against the Pi running on the same hardware.  I know from running the RC download today that the distro works and plays audio even on the onboard audio, and the default setup to use the onboard display, keyboard and mouse to show the Web interface by default is a lovely touch.